A Quilted Coat

For those of you who missed the Zoom Q&A on making a Quilted Coat, here is what we discussed.


The first question everyone has is What Pattern Do I Use???? And the answer depends on what style coat you want to make. If you are wanting to join the Free Spirit Coat Story Challenge, then you must use the Tamarack Jacket pattern by Grainline Studio. However, I also suggest for a roomier less fitted style, The Sewing Workshop's Chateau Coat. If you decided to make the Chateau Coat, then you simply make it as a lined coat and bind it just like you do when you are making the Tamarack Jacket.


For all the details on the Free Spirit Coat Story Challenge, visit their page to get a list of all the requirements.




For my own jacket I decided to use the Tamarack Jacket pattern by simply choosing an outer fabric and and inner fabric with 80/20 batting as my insulating layer between the fabrics. Years ago, this was actually one of the first jacket patterns I ever made and in that instance I simply put a cotton canvas and a cotton flannel together and quilted it on my domestic machine.




I started by taking the yardage and quilting it on my long arm just like I would a quilt.



Next, I laid my pattern pieces on the fabric and used my tailor's chalk to outline the pieces. This allowed me to quilt different patterns on the sleeves, front, back and pockets. You can also simply quilt the fabric in an E2E pattern and not have to chalk anything out.



Once I was done quilting I was ready to treat it just like yardage for making the jacket. Now I actually pinned the pieces where they had only been chalked out and began cutting my jacket pieces. If you are using the Tamarack Jacket pattern and following the directions, you will begin on page 23, but NOTE, I did NOT do the welted pockets. I used the pocket pattern piece as a pattern for my patch pockets on my coat. You will want to place them and sew them on BEFORE you start putting your coat pieces together.



TIP: I used my Bernina #50 Walking Foot for this project and it made each step of putting my coat together so much easier. You can visit Cameron & Josie at A Clean Stitch to get this very handy foot for your Bernina.




The Tamarack Jacket pattern calls for the back to be in two pieces, but I had chalked mine out as one piece and that required me to make some slight adjustments when sewing the front pieces to the back. I also altered the pattern to have a squared off bottom to the jacket rather than the curved bottom. After attaching my sleeves as instructed in Step 28, I used my serger to finished the interior of the armhole.


Now BEFORE sewing up my side seams as instructed in Step 29, I put the binding on my sleeve hems. Once that is done, sew the side seam on both sides and then you are ready to put your binding on the entire length of that seam from the sleeve to the bottom of the jacket. Be sure to fold your binding under at the sleeve end for a neat finish. Your interior seam on each side should look like mine does in the video below.


Now to finish your jacket by sewing on the final binding. Starting at the bottom of the back of the jacket attach your binding and begin making your way around the jacket working the binding in one continuous piece. It easily makes the turn around the neckline and I didn't find it necessary to cut my binding on the bias. Additionally, I did not finish my binding by hand, I used my walking foot to top stitch the binding making it quick and easy.


TIP: I used a 2 1/5" binding for my jacket to make sure it had plenty of room to be folding over the three layers.



Here are pictures of my finished jacket details...



For those of you who are local and would like to join me for my Quilted Jacket class on April 19, 2022, visit the shop to secure your spot. And if you would like to have yardage quilted on my long arm, I offer that service as well.